COVID-19 pandemic in the United States

The COVID-19 pandemic in the United States is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). More than 28,400,000 confirmed cases have been reported since January 2020, resulting in more than 508,000 deaths, the most of any country and the ninth-highest per capita. The U.S. has nearly a quarter of the world's cases and a fifth of all deaths. More Americans have died from COVID-19 than during World War II. COVID-19 became the third leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2020, behind heart disease and cancer. U.S. life expectancy dropped from 78.8 years in 2019 to 77.8 years in the first half of 2020. The pandemic is one of the most deadliest events in American history, second only to the American Civil War. On December 31, 2019, China announced the discovery of a cluster of pneumonia cases in Wuhan. The first American case was reported on January 20, and then-President Donald Trump declared the U.S. outbreak a public health emergency on January 31. Restrictions were placed on flights arriving from China, but the initial U.S. response to the pandemic was otherwise slow, in terms of preparing the healthcare system, stopping other travel, and testing. Meanwhile, Trump remained optimistic on the future of the coronavirus in the United States. The first known American deaths occurred in February. On March 6, Trump signed the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, which provided $8.3 billion in emergency funding for federal agencies to respond to the outbreak. On March 13, President Trump declared a national emergency. In mid-March, the Trump administration started to purchase large quantities of medical equipment, and in late March, it invoked the Defense Production Act to direct industries to produce medical equipment. By April 17, the federal government approved disaster declarations for all states and territories. By mid-April, cases had been confirmed in all fifty U.S. states, and by November in all inhabited U.S. territories. A second rise in infections began in June 2020, following relaxed restrictions in several states, leading to daily cases surpassing 60,000. A third rise in infections began around mid-October, leading to daily cases reaching over 100,000 by the end of the month.State and local responses to the outbreak have included prohibitions and cancellation of large-scale gatherings (including festivals and sporting events), stay-at-home orders, and school closures. Disproportionate numbers of cases have been observed among Black and Latino populations, and there were reported incidents of xenophobia and racism against Asian Americans. Clusters of infections and deaths have occurred in many areas.


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