Lemon

Lemon
P1030323.JPG
A fruiting lemon tree. A blossom is also visible.
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Family: Rutaceae
Genus: Citrus
Species:
C. limon
Binomial name
Citrus limon
Synonyms[1]
List
  • Citrus × aurantium subsp. bergamia (Risso & Poit.) Engl.
  • Citrus aurantium subsp. bergamia (Risso) Wight & Arn.
  • Citrus aurantium var. bergamia (Risso) Brandis
  • Citrus × aurantium var. mellarosa (Risso) Engl.
  • Citrus × bergamia Risso & Poit.
  • Citrus × bergamia subsp. mellarosa (Risso) D.Rivera & al.
  • Citrus × bergamota Raf.
  • Citrus × limodulcis D.Rivera, Obón & F.Méndez
  • Citrus × limonelloides Hayata
  • Citrus × limonia Osbeck
  • Citrus × limonia var. digitata Risso
  • Citrus × limonum Risso
  • Citrus medica var. limon L.
  • Citrus medica f. limon (L.) M.Hiroe
  • Citrus medica f. limon (L.) Hiroë
  • Citrus medica subsp. limonia (Risso) Hook. f.
  • Citrus × medica var. limonum (Risso) Brandis
  • Citrus × medica subsp. limonum (Risso) Engl.
  • Citrus medica var. limonum (Risso) Brandis
  • Citrus × mellarosa Risso
  • Citrus × meyeri Yu.Tanaka
  • Citrus × vulgaris Ferrarius ex Mill.
  • Limon× vulgaris Ferrarius ex Miller

The lemon (Citrus limon) is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to Asia, primarily Northeast India (Assam), Northern Myanmar or China.[2]

The tree's ellipsoidal yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses.[2] The pulp and rind are also used in cooking and baking. The juice of the lemon is about 5% to 6% citric acid, with a pH of around 2.2, giving it a sour taste. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods such as lemonade and lemon meringue pie.

  1. ^ "The Plant List:Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck". Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and Missouri Botanic Garden. Retrieved February 20, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Julia F. Morton (1987). "Lemon in Fruits of Warm Climates". Purdue University. pp. 160–168.

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