Pakistan

Coordinates: 30°N 70°E / 30°N 70°E / 30; 70

Islamic Republic of Pakistan

  • اِسلامی جمہوریہ پاكِستان (Urdu)
  • Islāmī Jumhūriyah Pākistān[1]
Motto: Īmān, Ittihād, Nazam
ایمان، اتحاد، نظم (Urdu)
"Faith, Unity, Discipline"[2]
Anthem: Qaumī Tarānah
قَومی ترانہ
"The National Anthem"
Land controlled by Pakistan shown in dark green; land claimed but not controlled shown in light green
Land controlled by Pakistan shown in dark green; land claimed but not controlled shown in light green
CapitalIslamabad
33°41′30″N 73°03′00″E / 33.69167°N 73.05000°E / 33.69167; 73.05000
Largest cityKarachi
24°51′36″N 67°00′36″E / 24.86000°N 67.01000°E / 24.86000; 67.01000
Official languagesEnglish
Recognised national languagesUrdu (7%)
Recognised regional languagesSindhi (15%)
Other languagesPunjabi (39%) • Pashto (18%) • Saraiki (12%) • Balochi (3%) • Hindko (2%) • Brahui (1%) • Kashmiri (0.17%)

BaltiBurushaskiDameliDomaakiGawar-BatiKalashaKhowarKohistaniKutchiMemoniPahari-PothwariShinaWakhiYidgha
Ethnic groups
(2020[3])
Religion
(1998[5])
See Religion in Pakistan
Demonym(s)Pakistani
GovernmentFederal parliamentary constitutional republic
• President
Arif Alvi
Imran Khan
Sadiq Sanjrani
Asad Qaiser
Gulzar Ahmed
LegislatureParliament
Senate
National Assembly
Independence 
from the United Kingdom
• Dominion
14 August 1947
23 March 1956
12 January 1972
14 August 1973
Area
• Total
881,913 km2 (340,509 sq mi)[a][7] (33rd)
• Water (%)
2.86
Population
• 2018 estimate
Increase212,228,286[8][9] (5th)
• 2017 census
Increase 207.8 million
• Density
244.4/km2 (633.0/sq mi) (56th)
GDP (PPP)2020 estimate
• Total
Increase $1.076 trillion[10] (22nd)
• Per capita
Decrease $5,160[10] (134th)
GDP (nominal)2019 estimate
• Total
Decrease $287.2 billion[10] (42nd)
• Per capita
Decrease $1,260[10] (151st)
Gini (2015)33.5[11]
medium
HDI (2020)Increase 0.557[12]
medium · 152nd
CurrencyPakistani rupee (₨) (PKR)
Time zoneUTC+05:00 (PST)
DST is not observed
Date format
Mains electricity230 V–50 Hz
Driving sideleft[13]
Calling code+92
ISO 3166 codePK
Internet TLD.pk

Pakistan,[c] officially the Islamic Republic of Pakistan,[d] is a country in South Asia. It is the world's fifth-most populous country with a population exceeding 212.2 million, and has the world's second-largest Muslim population. Pakistan is the 33rd-largest country by area, spanning 881,913 square kilometres (340,509 square miles). It has a 1,046-kilometre (650-mile) coastline along the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman in the south and is bordered by India to the east, Afghanistan to the west, Iran to the southwest, and China to the northeast. It is separated narrowly from Tajikistan by Afghanistan's Wakhan Corridor in the northwest, and also shares a maritime border with Oman.

Pakistan is the site of several ancient cultures, most notably the 8,500-year-old Neolithic site of Mehrgarh, the oldest in South Asia,[14] and the Bronze Age Indus Valley Civilisation, the most extensive of the civilisations of the Old World.[15][16] The region of Pakistan was the realm of empires and dynasties, including the Archaemenid; briefly that of Alexander the Great; the Seleucid, Maurya, Kushan, the Gupta;[17] the Umayyad Caliphate in its southern regions, the Ghaznavids, the Delhi Sultanate, the Mughals,[18] the Durrani Empire, the Sikh Empire (in the Punjab region), East India Company rule, and, most recently, the British Indian Empire from 1858 to 1947.

Spurred by the Pakistan Movement, which sought a homeland for the Muslims of British India, and election victories in 1946 by the Muslim League, Pakistan won independence in 1947 after the Partition of the British Indian Empire, which awarded separate statehood to its Muslim-majority regions and was accompanied by an unparalleled migration and loss of life.[19][20] Pakistan is an ethnically and linguistically diverse country, with similarly diverse geography and wildlife. Initially a dominion of the British Commonwealth, Pakistan adopted a constitution in 1956, becoming an Islamic republic. In 1971 East Pakistan seceded as the new country of Bangladesh after a civil war. During the following four decades, Pakistan was ruled by governments whose descriptions, although complex, commonly alternated between civilian and military, democratic and authoritarian, relatively secular and Islamicist.[21] Pakistan elected a civilian government 2008, and in 2010 adopted a parliamentary system with periodic elections.[22][23]

Pakistan has the sixth-largest standing armed forces in the world; it is a nuclear power and a declared nuclear-weapons state. It is ranked among the emerging and growth-leading economies,[24][25] and has a large and fast-growing middle class.[26][27] Pakistan's political history since independence has been characterized by periods of significant economic and military growth as well those of political and economic instability. The country faces challenges including poverty, illiteracy, and corruption.[28][29][30] Pakistan is a member of the UN, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation, the OIC, the Commonwealth of Nations, the SAARC, the Islamic Military Counter Terrorism Coalition, and is a major non-NATO ally.

  1. ^ James Minahan (2009). The Complete Guide to National Symbols and Emblems [2 Volumes]. ABC-CLIO. p. 141. ISBN 978-0-313-34497-8.
  2. ^ "The State Emblem". Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of Pakistan. Archived from the original on 1 July 2007. Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  3. ^ "Pakistan" The World Factbook — Central Intelligence Agency.
  4. ^ Cite error: The named reference Article_2 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  5. ^ "POPULATION BY RELIGION" (PDF). Pakistan Burau of Statistics, Government of Pakistan: 1.
  6. ^ "Pakistan statistics". Geohive. Archived from the original on 6 April 2013. Retrieved 20 April 2013.
  7. ^ "Where is Pakistan?". worldatlas.com.
  8. ^ ""World Population prospects – Population division"". population.un.org. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved 9 November 2019.
  9. ^ ""Overall total population" – World Population Prospects: The 2019 Revision" (xslx). population.un.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved 9 November 2019.
  10. ^ a b c d "World Economic Outlook Database, October 2020". IMF.org. International Monetary Fund. Retrieved 17 December 2020.
  11. ^ "GINI index (World Bank estimate)". data.worldbank.org. World Bank. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  12. ^ "Human Development Report 2020" (PDF). United Nations Development Programme. 2 December 2020. Retrieved 18 December 2020.
  13. ^ Miguel Loureiro (28 July 2005). "Driving—the good, the bad and the ugly". Daily Times. Pakistan. Archived from the original on 10 January 2012. Retrieved 6 February 2014.
  14. ^ Coningham, Robin; Young, Ruth (2015), The Archaeology of South Asia: From the Indus to Asoka, c. 6500 BCE – 200 CE, Cambridge University Press CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Quote: ""Mehrgarh remains one of the key sites in South Asia because it has provided the earliest known undisputed evidence for farming and pastoral communities in the region, and its plant and animal material provide clear evidence for the ongoing manipulation, and domestication, of certain species. Perhaps most importantly in a South Asian context, the role played by zebu makes this a distinctive, localised development, with a character completely different to other parts of the world. Finally, the longevity of the site, and its articulation with the neighbouring site of Nausharo (c. 2800—2000 BCE), provides a very clear continuity from South Asia's first farming villages to the emergence of its first cities (Jarrige, 1984)."
  15. ^ Wright, Rita P. (2009), The Ancient Indus: Urbanism, Economy, and Society, Cambridge University Press, pp. 1–2, ISBN 978-0-521-57219-4 Quote: "The Indus civilisation is one of three in the 'Ancient East' that, along with Mesopotamia and Pharaonic Egypt, was a cradle of early civilisation in the Old World (Childe, 1950). Mesopotamia and Egypt were longer lived, but coexisted with Indus civilisation during its florescence between 2600 and 1900 B.C. Of the three, the Indus was the most expansive, extending from today's northeast Afghanistan to Pakistan and India."
  16. ^ Allchin, Bridget; Allchin, Raymond (1982), The Rise of Civilization in India and Pakistan, Cambridge University Press, p. 131, ISBN 978-0-521-28550-6Quote: "During the second half of the fourth and early part of the third millennium B.C., a new development begins to become apparent in the greater Indus system, which we can now see to be a formative stage underlying the Mature Indus of the middle and late third millennium. This development seems to have involved the whole Indus system, and to a lesser extent the Indo-Iranian borderlands to its west, but largely left untouched the subcontinent east of the Indus system. (page 81)"
  17. ^ Wynbrandt, James (2009). A Brief History of Pakistan. Infobase Publishing. ISBN 978-0-8160-6184-6.
  18. ^ Spuler, Bertold (1969). The Muslim World: a Historical Survey. Leiden: E.J. Brill. ISBN 90-04-02104-3.
  19. ^ Copland, Ian (2001), India, 1885-1947: The Unmaking of an Empire, Seminar Studies in History, Longman, ISBN 978-0-582-38173-5 Quote: "However, the real turning point for the new Muslim League came with the general election of December 1945 and January 1946. Despite facing a rejuvenated Congress, the League won four-fifths of all the Muslim-reserved seats ... The result left no one, not least the British, in doubt about where the locus of power within the Muslim community now lay (p. 71) ... In most respects, therefore, the League's success in the elections of 1945–46 can be interpreted as a clear Muslim mandate for Pakistan. (p 72)"
  20. ^ Metcalf, Barbara D.; Metcalf, Thomas R. (2006), A Concise History of Modern India, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 978-1-139-45887-0 Quote: "The loss of life was immense, with estimates ranging from several hundred thousand up to a million. But, even for those who survived, fear generated a widespread perception that one could be safe only among members of one's own community; and this in turn helped consolidate loyalties towards the state, whether India or Pakistan, in which one might find a secure haven. This was especially important for Pakistan, where the succour it offered to Muslims gave that state for the first time a visible territorial reality. Fear too drove forward a mass migration unparalleled in the history of South Asia. ... Overall, partition uprooted some 12.5 million of undivided India's people."
  21. ^ Talbot, Ian (2016), A History of Modern South Asia: Politics, States, Diasporas, Yale University Press, pp. 227–240, ISBN 978-0-300-21659-2
  22. ^ "Pakistani parties to share power". BBC. 9 March 2008.
  23. ^ "Pakistan to curb president powers". BBC. 8 April 2010.
  24. ^ Iqbal, Anwar (8 November 2015). "Pakistan an emerging market economy: IMF". www.dawn.com. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  25. ^ Kaplan, Seth. "Is Pakistan an emerging market?". Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  26. ^ "Pakistan has 18th largest 'middle class' in the world: report". The Express Tribune. 16 October 2015.
  27. ^ "GDP ranking | Data". data.worldbank.org. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  28. ^ Mathew Joseph C. (2016). Understanding Pakistan: Emerging Voices from India. Taylor & Francis. p. 337. ISBN 978-1-351-99725-6.
  29. ^ "Poverty in Pakistan: Numerous efforts, many numbers, not enough results". aiddata.org.
  30. ^ "70% decline in terrorist attacks in Pakistan – The Express Tribune". tribune.com.pk. 9 September 2015.


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