Wushu (sport)

Wushu
10th all china games floor.jpg
A typical wushu taolu competition at the 2005 National Games of China
Highest governing bodyInternational Wushu Federation
First playedChina
Characteristics
ContactDependent on type of Wushu
Team membersIndividuals or Team
Mixed genderYes
TypeMartial art
VenueTaolu Carpet or Lei Tai
Presence
Country or regionWorldwide, Asia primarily
Olympic(Unofficial Sport) 2008
World Championships1991
World Games(Invitational Sport) 2009, 2013, 2022
Wushu
Also known asKung fu, CMA, WS
FocusStriking, Grappling, Throwing, Performance Martial Art
Country of originChina
Famous practitionersJet Li, Hossein Ojaghi , Wu Bin, Ray Park, Jon Foo, Wu Jing, Donnie Yen, Tony Jaa, Michael Jai White, Scott Adkins, Yuan Wen Qing, Cung Le, Dan Hardy, Pat Barry, Michelle Waterson, Andrei Stoica, Mathias Bettan, Daniel Ghiță, Johnny Yong Bosch, Alfred Hsing, Vincent Zhao, Dennis To, Liu Hailong, Huang Zitao, Caity Lotz, Fang Bian, Zabit Magomedsharipov, Manjunath Bellikuppi, Wei Rui, Wen Junhui, Jia Aoqi, Daniel Wu, Kong Hongxing
Wushu
Traditional Chinese武術
Simplified Chinese武术
Literal meaning"Martial arts"

Wushu (/ˌwˈʃ/), or Chinese Kungfu, is a hard and soft and complete martial art, as well as a full-contact sport.[1][2] It has a long history in reference to Chinese martial arts. It was developed in 1949 in an effort to standardize the practice of traditional Chinese martial arts,[3] yet attempts to structure the various decentralized martial arts traditions date back earlier, when the Central Guoshu Institute was established at Nanking in 1928.

"Wushu" is the Chinese term for "martial arts" (武 "Wu" = military or martial, 術 "Shu" = art). In contemporary times, Wushu has become an international sport under the International Wushu Federation (IWUF), which holds the World Wushu Championships every two years as well as other. Wushu has become an official event at the Asian Games, Southeast Asian Games, and the World Combat Games among other multi-sport events.

Competitive Wushu is composed of two disciplines: taolu (套路; forms) and sanda (散打; sparring). But it has other disciplines, like self defense, breaking hard objects, and other related practices, that are not performed in competitions.

Taolu involves martial art patterns, acrobatic movements and techniques for which competitors are judged and given points according to specific rules. The forms comprise basic movements (stances, kicks, punches, balances, jumps, sweeps, and throws) based on aggregate categories of traditional Chinese martial art styles, and can be changed for competitions to highlight one's strengths. Competitive forms have time limits that can range from 1 minute, 20 seconds for some external styles, to over five minutes for internal styles.

Sanda (sometimes called sanshou) is a modern fighting method and a full contact sport. Sanda contains boxing, kicks (kickboxing), and wrestling. It has all the combat aspects of wushu. Sanda appears much like kickboxing, boxing or Muay Thai, but includes many more grappling techniques. Sanda fighting competitions are often held alongside taolu.

  1. ^ Liu, Melinda (18 February 2010). "Kung Fu Fighting for Fans". Newsweek. Archived from the original on 30 August 2008.
  2. ^ Wren, Christopher (11 September 1983). "Of monks and martial arts". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 August 2010.
  3. ^ Fu, Zhongwen (2006) [1996]. Mastering Yang Style Taijiquan. Louis Swaine. Berkeley, California: Blue Snake Books. ISBN 1-58394-152-5.

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